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Week 8 - 08.06.20

Number Bonds

This week we are going to be recapping number bonds to 10 and looking at the different number bonds for 20. Remember, number bonds to 10 are 2 numbers that when added together equal 10. This means that number bonds to 20 will be 2 numbers that add together equal 20. To complete your number bonds work this week you will need to have some small items or objects that you can use to help with counting. As with all of your number work, make sure you are counting carefully, especially as your answers must always come to 10 or 20 for workings to be accurate!

 

As always, please send us any pictures of your home learning smiley

Monday

To complete the activities today you will need a piece of paper that you can split into ten pieces, you might need to ask your adult to help you with this. This is what your tens frame should look like:

You also need 10 objects that you can use to work out all of the different number bonds to make 10. You don't want your objects to be too big, or they won't fit into the squares of your tens frame, so try to choose items that are small, like pen lids or pieces of lego or small wooden blocks if you have them.

 

Today we are going to try and find the different pairs of numbers that are the number bonds for 10. Make sure you have your 10 items close by to help you. As you work out the different number bonds for 10 you will need to place your items on the tens frame. You will not need all 10 items for every number bond, and you can only put 1 item in each square of the tens frame! 

 

Can you see in the example below I have placed 8 pink counters in the tens frame, and left the other 2 squares empty?

 

To work out the number bond (and the addition number sentence) I need to count the number of items on my tens frame, the number of empty squares, and then add them altogether. Hopefully I end up with 10. Can you help me count? Let's start with pink counters first.....    Did you count 8? Now let's count the empty squares.....     Did you count 2? Finally we need to count all the squares together.....     10!

 

Now that we feel a bit more confident using the tens frames, you can use your items to help you find all the number bonds to 10. Below are some addition number sentences that show the number bonds to 10, but 1 of the numbers is missing and you will need to work out what it is! The first number in the number sentence is the amount of objects you need to put into squares on your tens frame. To find the value of the missing number you need to carefully count how many squares on your tens frame are empty. Can you solve all problems below and find the missing numbers to make the number bonds for 10?

 

1 + ___ = 10

2 + ___ = 10

3 + ___ = 10

4 + ___ = 10

5 + ___ = 10

6 + ___ = 10

7 + ___ = 10

8 + ___ = 10

9 + ___ = 10

10 + ___ = 10

Tuesday

Today we are continuing to look at number bonds, but instead of using a tens frame we are going to use a tens stick. You can draw one of these on a piece of paper if you like, it should look like the drawing below:

 

We are also going to write our number bonds as addition number sentences today, so make sure you include the add symbol (+) and the equals symbol (=) in your number sentences!

 

To work out our number bonds to 10 using a tens stick we are going to carefully count the amount of empty squares in the tens stick first, and then count the number of shaded in squares. When we add these two numbers it should make 10 altogether. This is a bit different to yesterday, as we counted the objects we had first, then the empty squares, so be extra careful to make sure you are counting the empty squares first this time.

 

Let's talk through an example, so we know how to use a tens stick. The tens stick below has some squares shaded in for us to use and the addition number sentence written for us. The addition number sentence for this tens stick is 7 + 3 = 10. We know this by looking at the number of empty squares and the number of shaded in squares to work out why this is correct.

 

 

Look carefully at the tens frame above. Can you see that 7 squares have been left empty? If you wrote this number bond as an addition number sentence you would need to write the number first. As it is an addition number sentence you would need to then write an add symbol (+) as you are going adding the empty squares and the shaded in squares together. Next, you need to count the number of shaded in squares. Can you see that there are 3 shaded in squares so after the add symbol you would need to write the number 3. Now you need to draw an equals sign (=) you are ready to add the 2 numbers together. Can you add the empty squares and the shaded in squares together? Hopefully you found that 7 add 3 equals 10.

 

If you want to double check your answer to see if you are correct you can use your fingers to help you. Start with all 10 fingers stuck out. Then take away the same amount of fingers as the amount of empty squares in the tens stick. If you do this carefully you should be left with with the same amount of fingers as shaded in squares.

 

Can you work through the tens sticks below and find out what numbers are missing in each of the addition number sentences showing the different number bonds to 10?

 

Wednesday

Today we are using tens sticks to look at number bonds again, but today we are moving on from number bonds to 10 and are going to be finding out the number bonds for 20. This means each number bond will need 2 tens sticks, otherwise there will not be enough squares! You will need to write the addition number sentences for the number bonds so make sure you have something to write on and something to write with.

 

Just like yesterday you need to count all of the empty squares first. Then, count all of the shaded in squares. Next you need to add the 2 amounts together, and if you do this carefully you should have 20 altogether. If you look carefully at the example below you can see the first number bond has been solved for us. There are 19 empty squares, 1 shaded in square and 20 squares altogether giving us the addition number sentence and number bond 19 + 1 = 20.

 

On some paper can you write the addition number sentences and number bonds for 20 shown below?

 

 

Hopefully you are managing to write the addition number sentences for the number bonds for 20 ok. Let's have a go at some more, again the first example has been written out for you.

 

Count carefully and you should see there are 18 empty squares, 2 shaded in squares and 20 squares altogether. This means the addition number sentence and number bond for 20 will be 18 + 2 = 20. Can you write out the last set of addition number sentences showing the different number bonds for 20?

 

Thursday

Today we are looking at number bonds to 20 again but we are going to be using objects to help us. Make sure you have 20 small items to help you solve these, you can use whatever you like to help you, just be sure to count out your 20 items very carefully!

 

We are also going to be solving these number bond problems differently today. For each number bond you will need to start with all 20 of your items. Look at the robots below. Each robot has the number 20 written on their tummy. There is also a box with a number in it above each robot and a box that does not have a number in it. We need to find out what number should be in the empty box! To do this you will need to split your 20 items into 2 groups to find the pair of numbers that make the number bonds for 20.

 

Let's start with the robot with 5 written above it. First, we need to check we have our 20 items. As the number 5 has been given to us, the next thing to do is give 5 items to the robot. We get to keep the rest. You should now have split your items into 2 groups - 1 group for the robot and 1 group for you. The group for the robot should have 5 items in it, but how many items are in the group that you have? You need to count how many you have to find out how many items are in your group.

Do this carefully.....     How many items did you count in your group?     Was it 15?

 

Check by counting your group again, but this time also add the items from the group for the robot. When you count the items in your group and in the robot's group you should have 20 items altogether. This means the number missing in the number bond is 15!

 

Can you use this method to find out the other missing numbers to make some more number bonds for 20?

When you finish have a go at making up some of your own examples for different number bonds for 20. Maybe you could draw a robot on a piece of paper and give them some of your 20 items. Carefully count out how many you give to the robot and how many you keep for yourself. Write down the different number bonds you find. How many different number bonds for 20 can you make?

Friday

Today you are going to use your knowledge of number bonds to play a game. Follow the link to take you to the top marks site where you can have a go at playing the Top Marks 'Hit the Button' game, for both number bonds to 10 and number bonds to 20. Have a go at each game a few times and see if you can improve on your total each time you play. How many number bonds for 10 and number bonds for 20 can you find in the time? Good luck!

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